Starting point for this project was the Wiener Werkstätte’s work program dating back to 1904. This manifest, on which the collective based all their works, dealt with the arise of industrial production and henceforth the rapid decline of interest in craftsmanship. Over a hundred years, and 3 further steps of industrial revolution later, we face a similar situation today. The dilemma described in the manifest from 1904 has set, but with the 4th industrial revolution building up, we are facing a technological revolution that will fundamentally change the way that we work, live and interact with each another. To fight against these developments would be madness, as aptly stated in the original manifest („...The machine has replaced the hand; the businessman has replaced the artisan. To swim against the current would seem to be madness.”Werksprogramm der Wiener Werkstätte, Vienna, 1904).

 
 
 
 

Going against my own believes, and those of the Wiener Werkstätte voiced in their manifest, I came to the logical conclusion that instead of annihilating mass produced goods, it would make sense to exactly exploit their benefits. Readily available, affordable mass-produced parts there are plenty. Why not use them as building blocks to design and construct unique objects?

The parts used are from a variety of sources, from thrift stores, downright trash, to parts from hardware stores.

Thanks to the standardisation of industrial processes a broad variety of parts can be combined, even if they were never intended to fit each other.

Inherent to the resulting objects is a form-language strong in reference to the industrial production processes of its parts. By repurposing and manually reconfiguring these parts, a very different set of objects emerges. 

Together they adopt a new function and become something else in this process.

The one thing they all have in common is their position in the hierarchy of things: them being labelled as „replacement parts“. Something that can easily be exchanged, replaced, discarded. They have no inherent value to themselves, produced in the tens of thousands and never bought for their aesthetic qualities.

Thanks to the standardisation of industrial processes a broad variety of parts can be combined, even if they were never intended to fit each other.

Inherent to the resulting objects is a form-language strong in reference to the industrial production processes of its parts. By repurposing and manually reconfiguring these parts, a very different set of objects emerges. 

Together they adopt a new function and become something else in this process.

this project has been made possible with the kind support of BKA - Federal Chancellery of Austria